AFY Kim Blue - Home Buyers Guide V1 - 3020

All agents hold the same responsibility, which is to inform their clients of all potential risks that could arise due to conflicts of interest. Legally, agents are not allowed to work on both sides of any transaction without consent from the clients. For example, if you’re selling your home, and you don’t want an agent to be working with the buyer, it’s your right to say so in the listing agreement. This is also true for the buyers. A buyer can get out of a buyer’s agency agreement, but only if their agent has a listing in which the buyer is interested. When it comes to dual agency, there are definite advantages for the seller. • Trust has already been gained with your listing agent, so representation for the buyer has been established. • Your agent brought you the buyer knowing that you’re selling, even if your property has not yet hit the market. • Your listing agent will already have covered and researched your neighborhood’s market to gain buyer inquiries, which means your agent will be working from all sides of the deal to sell your house faster, and with more incentive. • Your agent works together with corporate relocation buyers who need to find a house quickly, and they will ensure it’s your house that’s bought.

There are also cons when it comes to dual agency, and they are:

• You can’t be advised by your agent as thoroughly when they must act as a dual agent, because impartial facilitation is required. • Your listing agent is not allowed to negotiate the best or highest price for you if also negotiating both the best and lowest terms for the buyer. 12

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