Shawn Mileham - ExpiredV1

The cost is an obvious reason you should certainly include. It’s far from the only reason, however. Jot down a list of every feature you can think of for both your house and the newer ones. Then, compare different perspectives. For example, compare yards. Newly built houses typically don’t have established trees or landscaping. They might have freshly planted grass. That requires more work and more money. Here’s another idea: Think of the traffic and commotion in a new development where homes are still under construction. Focus on the positive by talking about how quiet your neighborhood is. Mention a peaceful home. Some buyers will see this as a point of attraction. These are just a few examples. You can turn any negative into a positive by reframing it. Remember, you control your story. It’s up to you to feature your home in a positive light. Do a good job of attracting buyers specifically interested in features your house offers, and you no longer have to compete against those new homes! Instead, you’ll be working with buyers already excited about something in your home. Taking this approach cuts out the competition, speeds up the sales process, and makes you more money. Just keep the 80/20 rule in mind during the selling process, and look for a point of difference to feature in your home. Focus on what makes the most impact, and you’ll be successful. POINTS TO REMEMBER: ; For your advertising, photograph your house in a way that emphasizes its best unique features. ; Highlight desirable differences in your ad in descriptive terms. ; Even a negative feature can help differentiate your home from others on the market. • • •

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