AFY Gina Newell - Biz-Card V1 - 2961

For example, a home in Ohio was put into one such system, Redfin's Home Worth calculator. The home last sold for $180,000 in 1998; it was appraised for refinancing in 2015 at $275,000. In 2017, Redfin’s calculator valued this 1890 Victorian home (4 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, and 2,100 square feet) in a four-block area of “Grand Old Ladies” at $158,000. The apparent reason is that the six “comps” (comparable recent sales) included only 2 homes in this desirable neighborhood (over $300,000), while four others outside this small neighborhood, although close, sold for $150,000 to $199,000. Because the system doesn’t understand the makeup of the area and simply pulled prices from a broader geographic area, the arrived-upon price was far below what it should have been. These tools are worthwhile for obtaining “comps” of area sales; however, they are not highly accurate in arriving at a listing price.

EXAMPLE OF DIFFERING HOME VALUATIONS

Say a buyer is interested in a home listed at $420,000. The online valuation determines the house is worth $440,000. Based on that estimate, the buyer offers the asking price. When a professional appraisal comes in at $400,000, and the existing tax records assess the home at $300,000, the buyer wonders why the values are so different and whether he overpaid. The house was listed at $420,000 because at that price, the home would sell in a reasonable amount of time. Why would the appraised value not be whatever a buyer was willing to pay? The fact that they paid $420,000 does not mean that is the true value of the home. Certain factors may weigh in — undesirable businesses located near the property, for example. Online valuations cannot take into consideration the condition of the property or the qualities of the neighborhood. Since an assessed home value is for taxing purposes only, it can be much more or much less than the market value. Ideally, they should be close, but usually they are not; it is based on a

6

Powered by